Washington Workforce Conference | Staff Presentation Highlights

Seattle-King County staff presented on a range of workforce development topics at annual statewide conference.

The Washington Workforce Conference took place November 6 & 7 with the theme “Powerful Partnerships: Building the Talent Pipeline,” hosted by the Washington Workforce Association.

Eleven staff and board member Ligaya Domingo from the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County presented nine seminars covering the current state of workforce development, with collaboration from the regional system and across the state.

In order of presentation:

The New Older Workplace

Beth Blanchard, Moderator/Lead Presenter
Georgia Duffy, Co-Presenter
Art Dreeban, Co-Presenter
Tom Auflick, Co-Presenter

The population of younger workers with sufficient education and skills is not large enough or growing fast enough to make up for the impending retirement of Baby Boomers. How are Workforce Development Councils and the WorkSource system prepared for and serving this population of jobseekers?

WWA-Presentation-Liesel.png

Investing in Staff as Front Line Leaders

Liesel Schilperoort, Moderator/Lead Presenter
Samara Reich Thomas, Co-Presenter

Investment in professional staff development brings substantial return. How do we know? Over the past 10 years, we’ve strategically coordinated training and curricula for professional development within WorkSource Seattle-King County.

WWA-Presentation-Jason.png

Partners in Apprenticeship: Workforce Development Councils as Innovators in Work-Based Learning

Jason Petrait, Moderator/Lead Presenter

We’re engaging apprenticeships, employers, unions, and job seekers to facilitate the expansion of existing apprenticeship opportunities and the growth of new apprenticeships. Attendees learned about the current state of work-based learning and how to recognize opportunities to expand apprenticeship in their workforce areas.

Equity and Economic Security for Immigrants, Refugees and All Working People: Re-Envisioning Workforce Development and Adult Education

Ligaya Domingo, Moderator
Glenn S. Davis, Lead Presenter
Jennifer Hernandez, Co-Presenter

Immigrants and refugees represent more than one in six American workers, over 17 percent of the workforce, but they remain disproportionally employed in low-wage service jobs with high levels of underemployment and involuntary part-time work. Attendees received a toolkit resource and discussed robust targeted workforce and adult education programs utilizing both WIOA and non-WIOA funding to address labor market, institutional, language, education, and social barriers facing immigrant jobseekers and workers.

WWA-Presentation-WSBrand.jpg

WorkSource Brand Basecamp: Marketing Solutions for WorkSource Professionals

Janelle Guthrie, Moderator
Gary Smith, Lead Presenter
Hannah Mello, Co-Presenter
Curt Wilson, Co-Presenter
Bill Tarrow, Co-Presenter

The Washington Workforce Association Brand and Media group works together to develop professionally branded materials for print, web, and social media. Attendees toured the new Brand Basecamp, designed to provide WorkSource staff with tools to conduct successful employer and job seeker outreach.

Micro-Information Products (MIP) Today – Getting the Most from the System You Already Have

Marcelle Wellington, Moderator
Patti Miele, Lead Presenter

Micro-Information Products (MIP) is one of the most flexible, robust, and popular non-profit accounting software services in today’s market. Attendees learned how to get the most out of the system in order to make strategic business decisions.

hpog-logo-t.gif

Learn from the Experiences of Two Local National Health Professions Opportunity Grant (HPOG) Projects in Multiple Areas in the State

Seanna Ruvkun, Moderator/Lead Presenter
Charlie Thompson, Co-Presenter

A discussion on lessons learned from participation in the national Health Professions Opportunity Grant (HPOG), administered by the US Department of Health and Human Services. Attendees identified opportunities and strategies for engaging diverse program participants in career pathway planning and progress aligned with industry need.

How Does an Integrated Communications Strategy Affect the Way We Do Business?

Hannah Mello, Moderator/Co-Presenter
Bryan Pannell, Lead Presenter
Heidi Seveska, Co-Presenter
Joe Taylor, Co-Presenter 

An effective communications strategy is critical to getting information to all possible audiences. Attendees learned how an integrated communications strategy allows small organizations to meet the increased opportunities—and demands—of the digital age.

WWA-Presentation-Sean-Mike.png

Job Readiness Training Curriculum: Evaluation and Professional Development for Youth Programs

Sean Morrin, Moderator/Lead Presenter
Mike Davie, Co-Presenter

Many curricula and programs aim to build the pipeline of workers by engaging young adults in job readiness training. Attendees learned how current research and tools can help to evaluate current job readiness curricula and programs to strategically plan for the future workforce.

Thanks to all presenters, attendees, and to the Washington Workforce Association for a great conference. See you next year!

New Grant from Retaining Employment & Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN)

*Release sent by the Washington State Employment Security Department

Washington to expand successful programs to help injured or ill employees return to work 

OLYMPIA – As Washington state prepares to celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness Month in October, the Employment Security Department (ESD) is celebrating a $2.5 million federal grant to help up to 400 workers who develop a potential injury or illness remain at work, return to work or attain a new job.

The grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) will fund a demonstration project (WA-RETAIN) focused on two specific populations: state employees at risk of filing long-term disability claims and people not eligible for workers’ compensation who are at risk of leaving the  workforce. Washington is one of eight states to receive this grant funding for the next 18 months.

Generally, the longer injured workers are out of work due to disability, the less likely they are to return to work at all. In fact, an employee who is out of work for six months has less than a 50 percent chance of returning to gainful employment. If lost time reaches one year, the chances of successfully returning to work drop to 10 percent.

The RETAIN Demonstration Projects are modeled after a program operating in Washington state for injured workers covered under the state’s Workers’ Compensation Program. The success of this effort in helping workers return to work sooner is one of several reasons why the state Department of Labor & Industries was able to propose a reduction in workers’ compensation premiums for 2019. 

WA-RETAIN will engage the Center of Occupational Health and Education Alliance of Western Washington as well as other state and local partners, including the Workforce Development Councils (WDCs) in King and Snohomish counties. Securing this Phase1 grant makes Washington eligible to compete for one of four grants of up to $19.75 million each to expand on the model created in the demonstration project.

“We want all Washington workers to have access to great employment opportunities and resources they need to be successful,” said ESD Commissioner Suzi LeVine. 

“The WDCs of King and Snohomish counties have been highly successful in serving workers with disabilities and their employers to date and we look forward to working with them on this moving forward to amplify and grow their efforts.”

“We are honored to receive these funds to build a model that helps workers reattach to the workforce,” said Erin Monroe, CEO of Workforce Snohomish. “The longer workers stay out of the workforce, the less likely they are to return to work. Our goal is to help people on the pathway to economic prosperity.”

“With the staggering rate of one in 10 working age Americans having a substantial disability that impacts their opportunities to work, we’re thrilled and honored to continue to support our workforce on their pathways towards self-sufficiency,” said Dot Fallihee, interim CEO of the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County. “Our WDC’s 47 WorkSource sites are proud to offer a depth of employment resources and opportunities for our residents.”

The WA-RETAIN project supports Gov. Jay Inslee’s goal of increasing the employment rate of working age people with disabilities in Washington and supplements efforts by the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment (GCDE). Toby Olson, Executive Secretary for the GCDE, will lead the project.

More information about the RETAIN grant is available at the US Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy site.

###

Contacts:   
Janelle Guthrie, Communications Director, 360-902-9289
Toby Olson, Executive Secretary of the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment: 360-902-9489

Follow ESD on social media:
Twitter: @ESDwaWorks | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WashingtonESD
YouTube: WashingtonESD | ESD’s Blog: https://washingtonesd.wordpress.com/

Sagal | A Portrait of Success in Healthcare

DSCN4476 copy.JPG

Sagal is a single mother of two school-age children. Together, they make their home in south Seattle. 

In 2013, when Sagal arrived in Seattle, she sought assistance from her local welfare office where her caseworker connected her with cash assistance and told her about the Health Careers for All program.  With an interest in healthcare, Sagal enrolled and joined a training cohort at South Seattle College to prepare for and enter nursing. To put food on the table, she also began part-time work doing remote medical interpretation from home, earning $500 monthly to help support her family, and moved off cash assistance. She completed all of nursing’s pre-requisite courses with competitive marks, moving on to the next step—the licensed practical nursing (LPN) program.

Throughout the intensive LPN program, Sagal says she benefited from the support of students and her “navigator” (career counselor), and in spring 2015 she successfully completed the program. That September, after passing the national credentialing exam and earning her state license, Sagal began full-time work as an LPN in a local rehabilitation center, earning $27 an hour. Sagal’s drive to become a nurse wasn’t yet satisfied—she stayed in close contact with her navigator and enrolled in the Health Workforce for the Future program in 2016 and was accepted into the LPN-to-RN ladder program at Highline College shortly after. She graduated with her associates degree in nursing (ADN) and secured a full-time registered nurse position at $39/hour in September 2017.  Sagal plans to continue her journey, with a final career goal of becoming an advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP).

Sagal-DCTweet.jpg

A few words from Sagal:

The reasons I would like to become a registered nurse are many ... I would love to motivate others who are in the same shoes as I was some years ago. I want to make them understand that hard work pays off, and to persevere and believe. I have always been a good student and have been able to achieve the goals that I set for myself. My children look up to me as a role model, and their grades at school reflect that. I want to be an exemplary person for my children so that they too can achieve their goals.

We congratulate Sagal and the hundreds of individuals who have dedicated their lives to our healthcare while building a prosperous future for themselves and their families.

Request for Proposals (RFP) 18-01 - Asian & Pacific Islander Adults

The Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County (WDC) is competitively procuring workforce program services for Asian and Pacific Islander Adults. Qualified organizations are invited to download RFP 18-01 on the WDC website at seakingwdc.org/rfp18-01 and respond by the deadline of Monday, 11/05/2018, 4 pm (PDT). Responding bidders agree to comply with all federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to equal employment opportunities. All WDC policies are available at seakingwdc.org/policies-guidelines. EOE/ADA

WorkSource Seattle-King County Program Year 2017 Leadership Award Winners

WorkSource Seattle-King County is staffed by a team of highly skilled and dedicated professionals working to uphold the principles of universal access, integration, performance and accountability, customer choice, partnership, and continuous quality improvement across the network’s 47 locations.

This past month, the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County and its WorkSource Operator Team had the opportunity to honor several individuals who have gone above and beyond in serving customers, pursuing best practices, and implementing Integrated Service Delivery and the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act in the past year.

Below are the winners of the WorkSource Seattle-King County Staff Leadership Recognition Awards for Program Year 2017.


FullSizeRender-3.jpeg

Jody Azevedo

Excellence in Customer Service

Jody is “traditionally the first to volunteer” when the need arises, and models exemplary service, all while making huge contributions to improving the overall system. She is an active member of numerous WorkSource functional teams, the customer engagement team, and facilitator team. She received not one, but three nominations, exemplifying the recognition by her peers for her tremendous passion and service.


FullSizeRender.jpeg

WorkSource Summit 2017 Planning Committee

Excellence in Teamwork

The collaborative efforts of all team members were reflected in the outcome of the 2017 WorkSource Summit—a successful bridging of WorkSource voices from across the state in an informative day-long conference dedicated to the philosophy and practice of Integrated Service Delivery. The planning committee brought a diverse set of perspectives, opinions, expertise, knowledge, and skills to create and promote this event to colleagues, coworkers, counterparts, and partners across the state, ultimately ensuring its success.

The team included Beth Blanchard, Craig Bruckshen, Nature Carter, Mary Dolliver, Georgia Duffy, Catherine Fisher, Deitra Garrett, John Glynn, Stephanie Guy, Brianna Kiarie, Saiqa Syeda, and members of the WorkSource Operator Team.


FullSizeRender-1.jpeg

Amanda See

Excellence in Leadership

Amanda’s core strengths include serving those with barriers and approaching all of her work through an equity lens. According to her nominator, she “understands that collaboration is about cross-communication, triaging services, and bouncing ideas off of others to ensure that every customer is provided with all available options. She encourages her staff and others to reach out to groups and organizations that are not being served through the WorkSource system.” Amanda’s dedication to collaboration has resulted in a successful partnership with 2nd Chance, a homeless encampment, which has resulted in specialized trainings, employment, and resource sharing across service providers.


FullSizeRender-2.jpeg

Julie Shor

Honorable Mention
Excellence in Leadership

A core member of the front-line staff, Julie’s passion, energy, and commitment to serving youth and young adults led to two nominations for the leadership award. As expressed by her nominators, Julie “is an excellent communicator. She double, triple checks if she can support you and how she can best do so. … She seeks to build strong relationships and makes time to ask if there is any other way she can support or improve.” Julie receives an honorable mention for her exemplary leadership by example.

Congratulations to all of our award winners and nominees!

***

WorkSource Seattle-King County connects businesses to job seekers, as a proud partner of the American Job Center Network under Washington state’s WorkSource brand. The Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County leads a network of 46 locations in providing job search/recruitment assistance, career planning and training, and hiring events at no cost to job seekers and businesses in Seattle-King County.