New Grant from Retaining Employment & Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN)

*Release sent by the Washington State Employment Security Department

Washington to expand successful programs to help injured or ill employees return to work 

OLYMPIA – As Washington state prepares to celebrate National Disability Employment Awareness Month in October, the Employment Security Department (ESD) is celebrating a $2.5 million federal grant to help up to 400 workers who develop a potential injury or illness remain at work, return to work or attain a new job.

The grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Retaining Employment and Talent After Injury/Illness Network (RETAIN) will fund a demonstration project (WA-RETAIN) focused on two specific populations: state employees at risk of filing long-term disability claims and people not eligible for workers’ compensation who are at risk of leaving the  workforce. Washington is one of eight states to receive this grant funding for the next 18 months.

Generally, the longer injured workers are out of work due to disability, the less likely they are to return to work at all. In fact, an employee who is out of work for six months has less than a 50 percent chance of returning to gainful employment. If lost time reaches one year, the chances of successfully returning to work drop to 10 percent.

The RETAIN Demonstration Projects are modeled after a program operating in Washington state for injured workers covered under the state’s Workers’ Compensation Program. The success of this effort in helping workers return to work sooner is one of several reasons why the state Department of Labor & Industries was able to propose a reduction in workers’ compensation premiums for 2019. 

WA-RETAIN will engage the Center of Occupational Health and Education Alliance of Western Washington as well as other state and local partners, including the Workforce Development Councils (WDCs) in King and Snohomish counties. Securing this Phase1 grant makes Washington eligible to compete for one of four grants of up to $19.75 million each to expand on the model created in the demonstration project.

“We want all Washington workers to have access to great employment opportunities and resources they need to be successful,” said ESD Commissioner Suzi LeVine. 

“The WDCs of King and Snohomish counties have been highly successful in serving workers with disabilities and their employers to date and we look forward to working with them on this moving forward to amplify and grow their efforts.”

“We are honored to receive these funds to build a model that helps workers reattach to the workforce,” said Erin Monroe, CEO of Workforce Snohomish. “The longer workers stay out of the workforce, the less likely they are to return to work. Our goal is to help people on the pathway to economic prosperity.”

“With the staggering rate of one in 10 working age Americans having a substantial disability that impacts their opportunities to work, we’re thrilled and honored to continue to support our workforce on their pathways towards self-sufficiency,” said Dot Fallihee, interim CEO of the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County. “Our WDC’s 47 WorkSource sites are proud to offer a depth of employment resources and opportunities for our residents.”

The WA-RETAIN project supports Gov. Jay Inslee’s goal of increasing the employment rate of working age people with disabilities in Washington and supplements efforts by the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment (GCDE). Toby Olson, Executive Secretary for the GCDE, will lead the project.

More information about the RETAIN grant is available at the US Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy site.

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Contacts:   
Janelle Guthrie, Communications Director, 360-902-9289
Toby Olson, Executive Secretary of the Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment: 360-902-9489

Follow ESD on social media:
Twitter: @ESDwaWorks | Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WashingtonESD
YouTube: WashingtonESD | ESD’s Blog: https://washingtonesd.wordpress.com/

Sagal | A Portrait of Success in Healthcare

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Sagal is a single mother of two children ages seven and nine. Together, they make their home in south Seattle.

A few years ago, Sagal met with a staff member at the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families’ (TANF) office looking for opportunities to improve her family’s financial stability. After learning about Sagal’s interests, talents, and skills, the caseworker suggested a number of opportunities, including in the healthcare industry, and specifically training as a nurse with Health Workforce for the Future. 

Sagal enrolled, joining the pre-requisite nursing cohort through South Seattle College. To put food on the table, she also began working part-time as a bilingual medical translator, stepping into the healthcare field while working from home doing remote translation and interpretation. Segal began earning about $500 each month to help support her family, and moved off TANF cash assistance. The flexibility of working from home also allowed her to support her children in lieu of additional childcare. Even while serving these many roles, she completed all of nursing’s pre-requisite courses with competitive marks, moving on to the next step—the licensed practical nursing (LPN) program.

Sagal met regularly with her fellow participants, particularly in the first four quarters, to share challenges and support. Therapeutic counseling helped Sagal manage the stress of balancing a job and studies with children. The navigator staff member that accompanied Sagal through the process ensured these resources were accessible. 

Sagal successfully completed LPN training, now just 11 months into the program. She studied intensely for the national credentialing exam (NCLEX-PN), and passed, gaining state license to work as a licensed practical nurse (LPN).

In September 2015, Sagal secured a LPN position in a local rehabilitation center, working 32 hours a week and earning $27 an hour. In an email to her navigator, she explained her drive to become a nurse:

“The reasons I would like to become a registered nurse are many ... I would love to motivate others who are in the same shoes as I was some years ago. I want to make them understand that hard work pays off, and to persevere and believe. I have always been a good student and have been able to achieve the goals that I set for myself. My children look up to me as a role model, and their grades at school reflect that. I want to be an exemplary person for my children so that they too can achieve their goals.”

Sagal was accepted into the LPN-to-RN ladder program at Highline College—just 17 months after her journey in healthcare began. She graduated with her associates degree in nursing (ADN) in June 2017, and gained her national certification and state license to begin full-time work as a registered nurse in September 2017, earning $39 an hour. Sagal has shared that she wants to continue her journey further by enrolling in the RN-to-BSN program at the University of Washington (UW-Bothell Campus), with the final career goal of becoming an advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP).

We congratulate Sagal and the hundreds of individuals who have dedicated their lives to our healthcare while building a prosperous future for themselves and their families.

WorkSource Seattle-King County Expands through New Sites & Partnerships

Free jobseeker and business services now available at forty-four locations throughout King County

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – March 30, 2018

Seattle, Wash. – The public workforce system of services known as the American One-Stop Job Network and “WorkSource” throughout Washington State has expanded in Seattle-King County. WorkSource Seattle-King County has expanded to 44 locations under the oversight of the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County and partners. New sites and partnerships broaden the system’s geographical reach and make services more accessible to a wide range of youth, adults, and businesses. Tax dollars at work provide employment and training services free of charge—including résumé and interview support, access to technology, employer hiring events, and more.

WorkSource Seattle-King County now includes 2 Centers offering access to all services, 6 Affiliates offering access to most services, and 36 Connection Sites offering electronic access to many available services (See map and menu of services here). All WorkSource locations are chosen strategically based on demand, with many featuring specialized staff to assist the diverse needs of job seekers and businesses. During the last program year, WorkSource Seattle-King County provided 206,689 staff-assisted services to 31,079 jobseekers in King County.

“WorkSource Seattle-King County exists to weave access to career opportunities into the fabric of our communities, connecting in-demand business with talented individuals,” says Beth Blanchard, WorkSource System Director at the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County. 

The WorkSource system’s 36 Connection Sites are founded on interagency partnerships through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), and provide access to WorkSource employment and training services in historically underserved communities. By partnering with a broad array of organizations typically serving niche populations with resources and services not exclusively related to employment or education—including housing, English language classes, disability resources, and mental health resources—WorkSource Seattle-King County expands and complements these opportunities to assist individuals working towards self-sufficiency.

“We are pleased to thank all of our local partners for their investment in our Seattle-King County system of WorkSource sites, and the creative, integrated thinking that continues to expand broad and diverse services for individuals at every stage of their career journey,” says Dot Fallihee, Interim CEO at the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County.

LinkWorkSource Seattle-King County Map & Menu of Services

Media Contact
Hannah Mello, Strategic Communications Manager
hmello@seakingwdc.org |  206-448-0474 x 3014
 

 

The Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County is an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Washington Telecommunications Relay Service 7-1-1.

Free Online Talent Pipeline Application Updated

Most recent labor market data available for jobseeker, career counselor, and business use

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – March 15, 2018

Seattle, Wash. – The most recent labor market data for Seattle-King County can be accessed at any time via the free, online “Talent Pipeline Application,” a resource provided by the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County. This dynamic, interactive, open-access resource contributes to the decisions of jobseekers, career counselors, researchers, students, employers, educators, and the press when it comes to workforce preparedness. The application is a valuable and relevant tool, delivering a reliable snapshot of our regional economy.

http://www.seakingwdc.org/talent-pipeline-app/

Updated data sets powering the application include: occupation employment counts, short and long-term projections, industry job distributions, and education program data. Users can view regional supply and demand data and cross-reference information by wage, required education level, occupation, and industry.

“This exciting application has proven its value over the last year since its launch,” says Dot Fallihee, interim Chief Executive Officer. “With the latest data, businesses and educators as well as those seeking long-term, self-sufficient employment in Seattle-King County can benefit in their contributions to our thriving region.”

Attend one of two “Resource Showcase” webinars to learn more about how to use the application:
Monday, April 9  |  10:00-11:00am
Tuesday, April 10  | 2:00-3:00pm


To Register:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/resource-showcase-interactive-talent-pipeline-application-tickets-44205011379

 

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The Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County is a nonprofit, grant-making organization dedicated to creating career pathways for adults and youth through demand-driven workforce and training programs. Led by a majority private sector board representing industry and partner agencies, the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County is positioned to serve both industry and community members as partners and customers. Learn more at seakingwdc.org.

 

Media Contact
Hannah Mello, Strategic Communications Manager
Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County
hmello@seakingwdc.org |  206-448-0474 x 3014

Inslee Awards $6.4 Million to Create Apprenticeships, Career Connections for 29,000 Youth

$1.3 million to Career Connect Seattle-King County

Olympia, WA - Job shadowing, internships and apprenticeships are just a few of the career connections that will become available to 29,000 students thanks to $6.4 million in new Career Connect Washington grant funding.

The awardees expect to create 29,000 new career connected learning experiences in 11 communities from now through September 2019. These include STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning experiences, job shadows at local employers, career planning, and over 4,800 new internships, pre-apprenticeships, and registered apprenticeships.

“A four-year degree isn’t the only path to a fulfilling career,” Gov. Jay Inslee said. “Business leaders have told us they are looking for talent in everything from information technology to health care. And that’s what this initiative is all about: connecting students to great employers and high-quality job training.”

The initiative expands registered apprenticeship programs and puts a new focus on youth registered apprenticeships. The awardees expect to move over 1,400 young people, plus more than 400 adults, into new apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeships in fields such as advanced manufacturing, health care, agricultural irrigation systems, building trades, IT and maritime manufacturing.

Read the rest of the story, including information about the $1.3 million awarded to Career Connect Seattle-King County, on the governor's Medium page.

Excerpt:

Career Connect Seattle-King County focuses on providing relevant experiences across the continuum of career awareness, exploration, preparation and training for all youth, with an emphasis on underrepresented populations. The proposal partners with Highline and Seattle Public Schools, along with Open Doors sites, while engaging business and expanding apprenticeship pathways for youth and adults across the aerospace, culinary, allied health and construction sectors.

Media Contact
Hannah Mello, Strategic Communications Manager
Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County
hmello@seakingwdc.org | 206.448.0474 x 3014